ricby42

run-charlie:

Still from Goldfinger, Eon Productions/United Artists, 1964.

run-charlie:

Still from Goldfinger, Eon Productions/United Artists, 1964.

Andreas Feininger: Skeletal structure of young monkey’s thin skull. September, 1951

Andreas Feininger: Skeletal structure of young monkey’s thin skull. September, 1951

Andreas Feininger (27 December 1906 - 18 February 1999) was American photographer and writer on photographic technique, noted for his photos of nature and cityscapes. The eldest son of the painter Lyonel Feininger, he studied cabinetmaking and architecture at the Bauhaus, the innovative design school in Weimar, Germany. During this period he began taking and processing photographs.
After graduating in 1925, he studied architecture at the Bauschule in Zerbst, Germany, in 1928 and worked as a cabinetmaker and as an architect. In 1933 he moved to Sweden, where he established a firm specializing in architectural and industrial photography. With the approach of World War II in 1939, Feininger immigrated with his family to New York City and began freelancing as a photographer.
In 1943 he became a staff photographer for Life magazine, a position he held until 1962. Among his best-known works are his richly detailed black-and-white views of New York, which were achieved through the use of experimental techniques and devices that Feininger pioneered throughout his career. He also took many photographs of natural objects, such as shells, trees, and bones, which he isolated from their surroundings in order to highlight their forms. Both his cityscapes and “portraits” of nature display the attention to the underlying structure of things that he gained from his studies of architecture and design.

Andreas Feininger (27 December 1906 - 18 February 1999) was American photographer and writer on photographic technique, noted for his photos of nature and cityscapes. The eldest son of the painter Lyonel Feininger, he studied cabinetmaking and architecture at the Bauhaus, the innovative design school in Weimar, Germany. During this period he began taking and processing photographs.

After graduating in 1925, he studied architecture at the Bauschule in Zerbst, Germany, in 1928 and worked as a cabinetmaker and as an architect. In 1933 he moved to Sweden, where he established a firm specializing in architectural and industrial photography. With the approach of World War II in 1939, Feininger immigrated with his family to New York City and began freelancing as a photographer.

In 1943 he became a staff photographer for Life magazine, a position he held until 1962. Among his best-known works are his richly detailed black-and-white views of New York, which were achieved through the use of experimental techniques and devices that Feininger pioneered throughout his career. He also took many photographs of natural objects, such as shells, trees, and bones, which he isolated from their surroundings in order to highlight their forms. Both his cityscapes and “portraits” of nature display the attention to the underlying structure of things that he gained from his studies of architecture and design.